ScrambleWatch Q&A: Republican David Gowan on Crime

Republican David Gowan is facing fellow Republican Frank Antenori and Democrat Andrea Dalessandro in the race for two seats in the House of Representatives in Legislative District 30. We asked him some questions on crime.

Should we increase state funding for prison construction?

It’s hard because we are in such a big hole. I like what Arpaio does. I think he has a good plan and he saves the county a lot of money. At the moment we have got to come out of our money crisis.

Should we have more contracts with private prisons?

I want to see how the ones that are out there are doing compared to the public ones. It’s not that I would support it or not, I would want to take a look at them and compare them.

Should we spend more on programs that provide prisoners with vocational education while they are behind bars?

Helping them earn their GED is Continue reading

ScrambleWatch Q&A: Republican David Gowan on Higher Education

Republican David Gowan is facing Republican Frank Antenori and Democrat Andrea Dalessandro in the race for two seats in Legislative District 30. We asked him some questions on higher education.

Should the state provide more funding for universities?

I would have to look at a line-item budget to figure that out. With a two billion dollar deficit, it depends if that is a necessity or is it frivolous.

Should the Board of Regents increase tuition for in-state students?

We’ve got to rely on them–that’s why they are a board. Then we go in and do a countercheck.

Should the Board of Regents increase tuition for out-of-state students?

I think it is appropriate that the out-of-state is a little higher.

Should tuition money be used to provide financial aid for low-income students?

Yes, I believe that. It helps them Continue reading

ScrambleWatch Q&A: Republican David Gowan on Education

Republican David Gowan is facing Republican Frank Antenori and Democrat Andrea Dalessandro race for two House seats in Legislative District 30. We asked him some questions about education.

Should the AIMS test remain a requirement for high-school graduation?

I know a lot of teachers don’t like it… Federally mandated standards make things rough. I’m all about patriotism but they still need to be learning their basic reading, math, and arithmetic. There should be some sort of performance standard. I heard from The Goldwater Institute that this is the first time in history that our students won’t know as much as their parents did.

Do you favor any changes for the AIMS test?

No, not at the moment.

Do you support state-funded vouchers for private or religious schools?

Yes, I believe in the parental school choice in that aspect. When you allow the free market to blossom, you have better situations. If I’m a parent and I Continue reading

LD30 Debate

The LD30 Clean Elections debate last Thursday between House of Representatives candidates Democrat Andrea Delasandro and Republicans David Gowan and Frank Antenori didn’t bring people out in droves; nor did the Senate race between Rep. Jonathan Paton and Democrat Georgette Valle.  But, for all you political junkies who didn’t attend, roll up your sleeve and tie off your arm: Here comes your fix.

House of Representatives

Moderator Dave Irwin gave the candidates two-and-a-half-minutes for opening statements.  We’ll give them a paragraph and a picture.

“Mr. Anetori,” who didn’t bother to correct the moderator’s mispronounciation of his name, went first. He told the fewer than 50-person crowd of mostly over 50-year-old voters that “the state is broken” and the most important thing for Arizona right now is getting the budget back on track, without gimmicks like traffic cameras. He called for employer sanctions and said we’ve got to deal with the education problem. He supports merit pay for teachers.

Next up was David Gowan, who thanked the voters who supported him in the primary election and mentioned his history, family, education and volunteer service with the Boy Scouts. He said we’ve got to take control of the state budget and the border and he believes in competition and merit pay for teachers.

Democrat Andrea Dalessandro said she wants to be part of the new delegation going to Phoenix.  She told the crowd that her humble childhood and work as a CPA makes her uniquely experienced to handle the budget. She calls for problem solving over politics and says protecting education is her top priority because “although children and young people are only part of our population, they are 100 percent of our future.”

Highlights from the House

What would your priority be in fixing the state budget?

Dalessandro says she wouldn’t cut back in schools but would make other necessary cuts, starting with the House speaker’s slush fund.

Antenori says most people think “politicians are good for two things–spending your money and asking for more. I’m not that kind of politician.” He calls legislators Continue reading

The After Math: Crunching Numbers in Last Week’s Primary

GOP champ: Al Melvin

Questions and answers in the wake of last week’s primary election:

What was the big takeaway in the legislative races?

Conservatives ruled. In almost every local race in GOP districts, the most conservative candidates carried the day.

In the GOP primary for the Legislative District 26 Senate seat, Republican Al Melvin beat state Rep. Pete Hershberger by exposing his liberal leanings, just as Melvin beat incumbent Toni Hellon two years ago. Melvin captured 10,131 votes compared to Hershberger’s 8,857 in the district which runs from SaddleBrooke down through Oro Valley and across the Catalina Foothills.

Now comes the big test for Melvin: Can he win a general election? Melvin has sanded down many of his rough edges, but he’s facing a savvy Democrat in Cheryl Cage, who managed a Democratic campaign that was able to overcome the GOP voter advantage in the 2006 District 26 House race. On top of that, the political mood still doesn’t favor Continue reading

ScrambleWatch Q&A: Republican David Gowan on Crime

Having made it through the primaries, Republican David Gowan will run against Frank Antenori and Andrea Dalessandro in the general election for one of two seats in Legislative District 30 House of Representatives. We asked him some questions on crime.

Should we increase state funding for prison construction?

It’s hard because we are in such a big hole. I like what Arpaio does. I think he has a good plan and he saves the county a lot of money. At the moment we have got to come out of our money crisis.

Should we have more contracts with private prisons?

I want to see how the ones that are out there are doing compared to the public ones. It’s not that I would support it or not, I would want to take a look at them and compare them.

Should we spend more on programs that provide prisoners with vocational education while they are behind bars?

Helping them earn their GED is a good thing. I think our problem is allowing them to have cable TV and other extra-curricular things. Education is a different thing. Rehabilitation is the purpose.

Should we look at alternatives to imprisonment for non-violent offenders?

I guess it depends on Continue reading

ScrambleWatch Q&A: Republican David Gowan on the Environment

Having made it through the primaries, Republican Frank Antenori will run against David Gowan and Andrea Dalessandro in the general election for one of two seats in Legislative District 30 House of Representatives. We asked him some questions on the environment.

Do you support allowing some state trust land to be set aside for conservation without payment to the trust?

No, because it’s there to fund our education-that’s in the Constitution.

Should the state set fuel-efficiency standards for cars and trucks sold in Arizona?

No.

Should the state increase gasoline taxes to pay for more highway construction?

No, no tax increase. We are at a $2 billion deficit from spending and we need to cut back a little. It’s not up to the tax payers to pay for the government’s spending habits.

Should the state require new schools to incorporate renewable-energy features such as solar panels if it will increase construction costs?

Locally, they can make that decision for themselves. If we give them a portion of money and they decide to do that, they are going to have to figure out how.

Should the state continue to provide tax credits for solar installation?

I guess that’s ok because someone is saying they have the power to decide where their money is going.

Should the state enact environmental rules that are more strict then federal regulations?

No.