ScrambleWatch Q&A: Republican Frank Antenori on Higher Education

Republican Frank Antenori is facing Republican David Gowan and Democrat Andrea Dalessandro in the race for two seats in House of Representatives in Legislative District 30. We asked him some questions on higher education.

Should the state provide more funding for universities?

Not in the disproportionate way the state has been doing it. I think we need to spend more of that money in the rural areas of the state. I also would like the UA to be able to profit from any research they do when they develop a patentable product. For example, if the UA developed a new landing device for Mars, I think they should be able to sell that technology and be able to get money off what goes to the university.

Should the Board of Regents increase tuition for in-state students?

No, I think that we need to decrease tuition as low as possible for in-state students. It is a fundamental principle that we should take care of our students first. Kids from this state, if I had my way, would pay virtually nothing.

Should the Board of Regents increase tuition for out-of-state students?

Out-of-state, I’m sorry. You want to come here from New Mexico, you are going to pay. The purpose of the Continue reading

Advertisements

ScrambleWatch Q&A: Democrat Andrea Dalessandro on Higher Education

Democrat Andrea Dalessandro is facing Republicans Frank Antenori and David Gowan in the race for two House of Represseats in Legislative District 30. We asked her some questions about higher education.

Should the state provide more funding for universities?

Yes, for public universities.

Should the Board of Regents increase tuition for in-state students?

I really think that’s a violation of the Arizona Constitution. Our constitution says that higher education should be as near free as possible. I grew up in a family with very modest means, but because of affordable higher education, I was able to go to college and become a math teacher in my first career. So, I think that if we want a better educated workforce, we have to support the students and not raise tuition.

Should the Board of Regents increase tuition for out-of-state students?

That’s OK with me. While it’s good to have diversity, taxpayers within the state Continue reading

ScrambleWatch Q&A: Republican Frank Antenori on Education

Republican Frank Antenori is facing Republican David Gowan and Democrat Andrea Dalessandro in the race for two House seats in Legislative District 30. We asked him some questions on education.

Should the AIMS test remain a requirement for high-school graduation?

You have to have some sort of benchmark. If you leave it to the subjectivity of the teacher, you are going to have such a wide standard range and it’s not going to be fun. You’ve got to have a statewide objective resource to measure performance, so you know which schools are cutting the mustard and which aren’t. That’s why I like the Regents Exam. There are just some kids that can’t pass the AIMS. They spent twelve years in school, got decent grades, are hard-working kids, and they have an aptitude issue or an inability to take tests-–there are various reasons. I believe they should be given a diploma. But there should be some credit for kids that are able to pass a standardized test that demonstrates their aptitude across the board. That’s where I think a Regents type exam where you have two diplomas, a standard diploma and Regents diploma, should be looked at.

Do you favor any changes for the AIMS test?

It should always be changed. You look at what they do with the SAT and the ACT; they change them every year. There’s a committee that evaluates societal norms, cultural changes and scientific changes. There’s always a requirement to change the test and update the test. I think it should have an annual review of educators and professors and professionals to determine the test is fair, equitable and up-to-date.

Do you support state-funded vouchers for private or religious schools?

I don’t favor them for religious schools, because I fear them being abused. You open the door to…all these crazy schools. You open the door to all these schools like that one sect of Mormons…And you just get nervous. I believe in public schools vouchers, to include charter schools and Continue reading

ScrambleWatch Q&A: Democrat Andrea Dalessandro on Education

Democrat Andrea Dalessandro is facing Republicans Frank Antenori and David Gowan in the race for two House seats in Legislative District 30. We asked her some questions about education.

Should the AIMS test remain a requirement for high-school graduation?

What’s happened with No Child Left Behind is the only people who are being helped out by it are the companies that generate the test. I think there should be other measures. The augmentation that they passed at the end of this session is a good thing. I have friends that are very smart and they have trouble with standardized tests. I, myself, am a good test taker, so I’ve never minded, but there are just some people that have anxiety–some have anxiety on a reading part, some have anxiety on a math portion. I was a math teacher, so I know what happens with that. I think it puts an undue stress on the teacher and the students. I’m also concerned that sometimes special-ed students and English language learners are forced to take the test, and it’s stupid. I think we need to look at a floor review of students and their achievements.

Do you favor any changes for the AIMS test?

Yes, I just would like to mention that assessment is an important part of education. But, to give one blank test for everyone, it doesn’t show the individual’s abilities. I think it should be part of the picture, but not the whole picture. I’ve read information about teachers not wanting to teach on the grades that the AIMS test has given, because it is a bad reflection on them. I think teachers should be evaluated on how students improve over the year.

Do you support state-funded vouchers for private or religious schools?

No, public funds should be used for public schools.

Does the state need to spend more on school construction?

Yes, I would like to see the schools Continue reading

Tucson Weekly Endorsement: Paton in District 30 Senate

In his two terms in the House, Jonathan Paton has pushed for government accountability. He hasn’t tried to cripple government, but has instead tried to find ways to make it work better. We don’t agree with him on everything–he’s too willing to believe that all tax cuts will automatically benefit the overall economy–but he has pushed to open government records to the press, fixed loopholes that left private medical records at risk and fought for reform of Child Protective Services to ensure that the agency works more closely with law enforcement when children are in danger.

Besides, since Republicans are almost certain to hang on to their majority in the Arizona Senate, it would be helpful to have at least one experienced lawmaker in the GOP caucus from Southern Arizona who has proven he can work with Democrats and battle for Southern Arizona’s interests.

Paton’s Democratic opponent, Georgette Valle, seems to have her heart in the right place–but the former Washington state lawmaker was consistently criticized by Seattle-area media as being ineffective and unaccomplished in office. While we admire Valle’s heart, the last thing Southern Arizona needs is an ineffective representative in Phoenix.

Following the Money in Antenori/Sposito/Collins/Gowan LD30 Four-Way

A few weeks back, we mentioned that Republican Frank Antenori went on a bit of a rampage against his fellow GOP candidates in Legislative District 30.

Antenori was angry that fellow Republican Doug Sposito and his supporters were spending so much money that the Clean Elections candidates in the race—Sharon Collins and David Gowan—were getting a windfall in matching funds. As of last week, Gowan had received more than $38,000, while Collins had more than $32K.

Meanwhile, Antenori has been struggling to raise private funds. His most recent report, filed last week, shows that he had collected just $15,669 for his campaign and had less than $2,200 left in the bank.

Antenori said Sposito had “obviously sold out” to Maricopa-based special interests that want to water down the employer-sanctions law with Stop Illegal Hiring, a ballot proposition that was originally launched to counter a more draconian employer-sanctions initiative that was being pushed by state Rep. Russell Pearce and his idiot pal, Don Goldwater. Those knotheads failed to make the ballot and are now complaining that Stop Illegal Hiring, which is supported by a group called Wake Up Arizona, will water down the current state law.

Sposito, who supports Stop Illegal Hiring, told us that a July fundraising event in Phoenix sponsored by supporters of Wake Up Arizona only raised him about $2,500. The big influx on money had come from his own pocket; he’d loaned his campaign $12,000.

The latest campaign finance reports, filed last week, show that of the $27,785 that Sposito had raised in the latest period, about $4,700 came from a variety of lawyers, lobbyists and other contributors in the Phoenix area, although he says not all of it came as a result of the July event.

“The Phoenix fundraiser netted me exactly $2,015,” Sposito says. “The rest has been from people mailing me contributions—hearing about my campaign, reading about it in the newspapers and checks are coming in.”

The names of the heavy hitters with Wake Up Arizona, such as McDonald’s magnate Mac Magruder and political consultant Nathan Sproul, do not appear as contributors.

Antenori now says he “would not believe that Doug would be stupid enough to accept contributions from those kinds of controversial individuals because it would crush him.”

Sposito has received a $390 check from auto dealer Jim Click, who is also part of Wake Up Arizona. But so has Antenori, although he downplays its significance.

“If Click wanted to give me money, I’d be sitting on about $40,000 in cash right now,” Antenori says. “So he sends me a $390 check—I didn’t get a check from his wife, his kids, his uncle, his cousins, all these other folks. … And that’s just so he can say, ‘Yeah, I support Frank.’ Evidently, Continue reading

Scranblewatch Q&A with Doug Sposito on the Budget

Doug Sposito is one of four Republican candidates running for a seat in Legislative District 30 House of Representatives. We asked him if state spending is too high, too low, or just right in the following areas:

Education:

Too low.

English Language Learning Programs:

Too high.

Emergency preparedness:

Too low.

Environment:

Too low.

Health care:

Too low.

Law enforcement:

Too low.

Transportation and highway infrastructure:

Too low.

Welfare:

Too high.

Universities:

Too low.